Assignment 6 – Dérive

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Assignment 6: Dérive – drift
Due: W 7:D 2 
What to Turn In: 
When you’ve completed your drift, you both write down what your “authentic” experience produced. This should be a 2-3 paragraph explanation sent to me via email – croderic@harpercollege.edu

In psychogeography, a dérive is an unplanned journey through a landscape, usually urban, where an individual travels where the subtle aesthetic contours of the surrounding architecture and geography subconsciously direct them with the ultimate goal of encountering an entirely new and authentic experience. Situationist theorist Guy Debord defines the dérive as “a mode of experimental behavior linked to the conditions of urban society: a technique of rapid passage through varied ambiances.” He also notes that “the term also designates a specific uninterrupted period of dériving.”[1] The term is literally translated into English as drift.

Psychogeography was defined in 1955 by Guy Debord as “the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals.”[1] Another definition is “a whole toy box full of playful, inventive strategies for exploring cities…just about anything that takes pedestrians off their predictable paths and jolts them into a new awareness of the urban landscape.”[2]

For the class – Groups of 2

Follow the map – each person has a role:

  • One person is the navigator – use the map
  • One person is the observer – observe things that normally you don’t question, but wonder about.
  • Both persons are recorders – discuss what signs/symbols you encountered along your journey.

What to Turn In: When you’ve completed your drift, you both write down what your “authentic” experience produced. This should be a 2-3 paragraph explanation.

Examples of things to pay attention to:

derive01.jpgderive02.jpg

derive03.jpgderive04.jpg

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